What kind of container is best for orchids?

May, 2022
Darren Spalding

Other pots had negative factors that weighed down their rankings. Growers especially love this type of pot. Incorrectly selected pots for orchids will entail unpleasant consequences and even the death of indoor flowers. One solution to this is to use a wire mesh before adding a potting medium and completely covering the floor.

Choose a plastic orchid pot, terracotta, or a decorative ceramic orchid pot and make sure there are one or more drainage holes at the bottom or sides of the pot. Choose a plastic orchid pot, terracotta, or a decorative ceramic orchid pot and make sure there are one or more drainage holes at the bottom or sides of the pot. The plastic pot has some drawbacks.

Do phalaenopsis orchids need clear pots?

Perlite or sponge rock (large perlite) and foam are a new addition to the flower medium. This is ideal for phalaenopsis and plants that need a little more moisture. Although clear pots are the ideal choice for growing healthy orchids, you may feel that they aren't particularly decorative or inspiring. Take the time to care for these beautiful flowers — they'll last longer than when flowers are delivered to your door. The best compromise, however, is to store your orchid in its clear pot but put it in a decorative pot lid.

In addition, the chemicals in certain glazes used for ceramic pots can be very harmful to the roots of sensitive orchids.

When should I repot a phalaenopsis orchid?

The next step in repotting phalaenopsis orchids is to examine the roots and remove damaged or unhealthy roots. As a rule of thumb, phalaenopsis orchids should be repotted every one to two years. However, sometimes you may need to repot your orchid earlier. Many phalaenopsis are sold potted in sphagnum moss and often the moss is packed very tightly around the roots so that the plants can retain moisture while they are being transported for sale. I wanted to repot briefly before it blooms but the roots that come through are sure to be broken.

But as excited as you might be to see new aerial roots sprout, it's best to wait until the little guys are about half an inch (1.2 cm) long to repot an orchid. When doing so, be very careful to break or damage these new roots as they won't grow back.

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